Soy.

Green earth Systems, SELLERS Soybean NON GMO – Direct to China. The soybean or soya bean is a species of legume native to East Asia, widely grown for its edible bean which has numerous uses. The plant is classed as an oilseed rather than a pulse by the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO).

Fat-free soybean meal is a primary, low-cost source of protein for animal feeds and most prepackaged meals; soy vegetable oil is another product of processing the soybean crop. For example, soybean products such as textured vegetable protein (TVP) are ingredients in many meat and dairy analogues. Soybeans produce significantly more protein per acre than most other uses of land.

Traditional nonfermented food uses of soybeans include soy milk, and from the latter tofu and tofu skin. Fermented foods include soy sauce, fermented bean paste, natto, and tempeh, among others. The oil is used in many industrial applications.

The main producers of soy are the United States (35%), Brazil (27%), Argentina (19%), China (6%) and India (4%).

NON-GMO Soybeans from Brazil vs GMO (Genetically Modified Organism)

GMO (Genetically Modified Organism) soybeans are genetically modified foods. GMO soybeans are different from plants that are crossbred for desirable traits. Rather, GMO soybeans have been altered by transplanting desired genes from one plant to another. GMO soybeans help increase crop yields, but the possible harmful effects of genetically modified foods has many people demanding non GMO soybeans instead.

GMO soybeans make it possible for farmers to plant hardier plants that are more resistant to disease and other environmental factors. Non GMO soybeans, such as the Roundup Ready soybean, cannot be exposed to chemical pesticides or treated during storage. Genetically modified soybeans, on the other hand, can be created in such a way that they can be treated if necessary.

Since traits are simply transplanted from one breed to the other when creating genetically modified foods, producing soybeans with desirable traits is much quicker through genetic engineering than it is through crossbreeding. In addition, GMO soybeans help increase profits for farmers while helping them meet the growing demand for food. Despite the positive aspects of genetically modified foods, many people are concerned about the possible negative side effects and want to only deal with non GMO soybeans and other foods.

DRAWBACKS TO GMO Soybeans

Creating genetically engineered foods is quite costly to research and to develop. In addition, the development of genetically modified foods can make it easy for one company to monopolize the market.

The possible negative side effects of genetically modified foods, however, are the primary reasons so many people prefer non GMO soybeans. Many fear that the science of creating genetically engineered foods is not advanced enough to determine whether these foods are safe.

Unfortunately, maintaining the purity of non GMO soybeans is difficult because GMO soybeans have the ability to crossbreed with these plants during the growing season. This has added another concern regarding genetically modified foods – the Terminator gene. This gene has been purposely placed in genetically engineered foods in order to cause GMO seeds to sterilize seeds produced by the plant. In this way, the technology of the companies who produced the seeds is preserved. Unfortunately, this terminator gene can crossbreed with non GMO soybeans and other plants to sterilize these plants, as well. Many fear that this could lead to increased world hunger as plants fail to reproduce.

World Soybean Production: Area Harvested, Yield, 
and Long-Term Projections

Soybeans (Glycine max) serve as one of the most valuable crops in the world, not only as an oil seed crop and feed for livestock and aquaculture, but also as a good source of protein for the human diet and as a biofuel feedstock. The world soybean production increased by 4.6% annually from 1961 to 2007 and reached average annual production of 217.6 million tons in 2005-07. World production of soybeans is predicted to increase by 2.2% annually to 371.3 million tons by 2030 using an exponential smoothing model with a damped trend. Finally, three scenarios and their implications are presented for increasing supply as land availability declines. The scenarios highlight for agribusiness policy makers and managers the urgent need for significant investments in yield improving research. Soybean, production, yield, land use, long-term projection, exponential smoothing with damped trend.

Top Soybean Producers
America led the world in soybean production in 2005, with an output of 84 million metric tonnes. Second-place Brazil produced 57 million tonnes, followed by Argentina with 41 million tonnes and China with 18 million tonnes.
America’s average annual growth rate of soybean production over the past 4 decades is 5% compared to Brazil’s more robust 14% average annual increase. Experts expect Brazil to overtake America as the world’s largest soybean producer within a few years.
Boasting an average annual increase of 27%, Argentinean soybean production has risen even faster than Brazil. Both South American nations have become strong competitors for the U.S. in the world soybean market.

Top Soybean Consumers
In 2005, the U.S. was the number one soybean consumer in the world. The list below reveals other leading soybean consuming countries.

  1. United States … 51 million tonnes (61% of U.S. production)
  2. Brazil … 32 million tonnes (56% of Brazilian production)
  3. Argentina … 31 million tonnes (76% of Argentinean production)
  4. China … 45 million tonnes (250% of Chinese production)

European Union nations consumed 15 million tonnes of soybean products in 2005.
China continues to experience the fastest growth in soybean consumption. Increased incomes in the People’s Republic are fuelling increased demand for soyoil. As well, more soymeal is being used as feed in China’s developing livestock industry.

The following list shows the three soybean-producing nations that are best-positioned to benefit from China’s accelerating demand for soybeans.

Top Soybean Exporters
Brazil, America and Argentina generated over 92% of global soybean exports in 2005.

  1. Brazil … 25 million tonnes (39% of world soybean exports)
  2. United States … 24 million tonnes (37%)
  3. Argentina … 10 million tonnes (16%)

Brazil became the world’s largest soybean exporter in 2005, surpassing the U.S. for the first time. America’s share of global soybean exports has declined from 73% in 1995 to 37% in 2005.
In contrast, Brazil’s percentage of world soybean exports jumped from 11% to 39% over the same period. Similarly, Argentina’s market share rose from 6% to 16% in just 10 years.
Top Soybean Importers
Below are the leading soybean importers in 2005. The top 4 importers tallied about three-quarters total global soybean imports.

  1. China … 27 million tonnes (41% of world soybean imports)
  2. European Union … 14 million tonnes (22%)
  3. Japan … 4 million tonnes (6%)
  4. Mexico … 4 million tonnes (6%)

Chinese soybean imports have skyrocketed by more than 27 times from 0.8 million tonnes in 1995. In addition to the robust domestic appetite for soy products, extensive investment in soybean crushing facilities in Chinese coastal cities has added to China’s escalating demand for imported soybeans.
Over half of the world’s 2007 soybean crop (58.6%) was genetically modified, a higher percentage than for any other crop. Each year, EU Member States import approximately 40 million tonnes of soy material, primarily destined for use as cattle, swine, and chicken feed. Soybeans are also used to produce many food additives. 
In 2007, 216 million tonnes of soybeans were produced worldwide. The world’s leading soybean producers are the United States (33%), Brazil (27%), Argentina (21%), and China (7%). India and Paraguay are also noteworthy soybean producers.

Worldwide soybean production: The first genetically modified soybeans were planted in the United States in 1996. More than ten years later, GM soybeans are planted in nine countries covering more than 60 million hectares. These GM soybeans possess a gene that confers herbicide resistance.

GM plants are widespread in the world’s leading soybean producing countries.

The United States (85%) and Argentina (98%) produce almost exclusively GM soybeans. In these countries, GM soybeans are approved without restrictions and are treated just like conventional soybeans. Producers and government officials in the US and Argentina do not see a reason to keep GM and conventionally
bred cultivars separate – whether during harvest, shipment, storage or processing. Soybean imports from these countries generally contain a high amount of GM content. Large-scale, commercial plantings of genetically modified soybeans can also be found in Paraguay, Canada, Uruguay and South Africa.At one time, GM soybeans were not permitted in Brazil. Nevertheless, GM seed was smuggled in from neighbouring countries and planted illegally. Now, GM soybeans are approved. In 2007, 64 per cent of the country’s soybean crop is genetically modified. Most of Brazil’s conventional soybeans are grown in the northern part of the country. European food and feed companies were able to determine that soybeans from northern Brazil contain little or no GM material.

 

World Soybean Production: Area Harvested, Yield, 
and Long-Term Projections

Soybeans (Glycine max) serve as one of the most valuable crops in the world, not only as an oil seed crop and feed for livestock and aquaculture, but also as a good source of protein for the human diet and as a biofuel feedstock. The world soybean production increased by 4.6% annually from 1961 to 2007 and reached average annual production of 217.6 million tons in 2005-07. World production of soybeans is predicted to increase by 2.2% annually to 371.3 million tons by 2030 using an exponential smoothing model with a damped trend. Finally, three scenarios and their implications are presented for increasing supply as land availability declines. The scenarios highlight for agribusiness policy makers and managers the urgent need for significant investments in yield improving research. Soybean, production, yield, land use, long-term projection, exponential smoothing with damped trend

Top Soybean Producers
America led the world in soybean production in 2005, with an output of 84 million metric tonnes. Second-place Brazil produced 57 million tonnes, followed by Argentina with 41 million tonnes and China with 18 million tonnes.
America’s average annual growth rate of soybean production over the past 4 decades is 5% compared to Brazil’s more robust 14% average annual increase. Experts expect Brazil to overtake America as the world’s largest soybean producer within a few years.
Boasting an average annual increase of 27%, Argentinean soybean production has risen even faster than Brazil. Both South American nations have become strong competitors for the U.S. in the world soybean market.

Top Soybean Consumers
In 2005, the U.S. was the number one soybean consumer in the world. The list below reveals other leading soybean consuming countries.

  1. United States … 51 million tonnes (61% of U.S. production)
  2. Brazil … 32 million tonnes (56% of Brazilian production)
  3. Argentina … 31 million tonnes (76% of Argentinean production)
  4. China … 45 million tonnes (250% of Chinese production)

European Union nations consumed 15 million tonnes of soybean products in 2005.
China continues to experience the fastest growth in soybean consumption. Increased incomes in the People’s Republic are fuelling increased demand for soyoil. As well, more soymeal is being used as feed in China’s developing livestock industry.
The following list shows the three soybean-producing nations that are best-positioned to benefit from China’s accelerating demand for soybeans.

Top Soybean Exporters
Brazil, America and Argentina generated over 92% of global soybean exports in 2005.

  1. Brazil … 25 million tonnes (39% of world soybean exports)
  2. United States … 24 million tonnes (37%)
  3. Argentina … 10 million tonnes (16%)

Brazil became the world’s largest soybean exporter in 2005, surpassing the U.S. for the first time. America’s share of global soybean exports has declined from 73% in 1995 to 37% in 2005.
In contrast, Brazil’s percentage of world soybean exports jumped from 11% to 39% over the same period. Similarly, Argentina’s market share rose from 6% to 16% in just 10 years.
Top Soybean Importers
Below are the leading soybean importers in 2005. The top 4 importers tallied about three-quarters total global soybean imports.

  1. China … 27 million tonnes (41% of world soybean imports)
  2. European Union … 14 million tonnes (22%)
  3. Japan … 4 million tonnes (6%)
  4. Mexico … 4 million tonnes (6%)

 

Soy NewsCorn, soybean price collapse not expected

Crop prices during 2011 were influenced by a wide range of factors that resulted in extremely large trading ranges, said University of Illinois agricultural economist Darrel Good.
Soybeans Trade Close To 7-day High On Brazil Crop Concerns

Soybean futures rose on Monday, trading close to a seven-day high as adverse weather forecasts fuelled concerns over crop conditions in Brazil, while hopes that European leaders will boost efforts to tackle the region’s debt crisis lent further support.
U.S. soybean farmers mark 20 years of checkoff work

U.S. soybean farmers aren’t spending much time recognizing the first 20 years of the United Soybean Board and the national soybean checkoff. They’re too busy planning for the next 20 years.

GM plants are widespread in the world’s leading soybean producing countries.

  • The United States (85%) and Argentina (98%) produce almost exclusively GM soybeans. In these countries, GM soybeans are approved without restrictions and are treated just like conventional soybeans. Producers and government officials in the US and Argentina do not see a reason to keep GM and conventionally bred cultivars separate – whether during harvest, shipment, storage or processing. Soybean imports from these countries generally contain a high amount of GM content.
  • At one time, GM soybeans were not permitted in Brazil. Nevertheless, GM seed was smuggled in from neighbouring countries and planted illegally. Now, GM soybeans are approved. In 2007, 64 per cent of the country’s soybean crop is genetically modified. Most of Brazil’s conventional soybeans are grown in the northern part of the country. European food and feed companies were able to determine that soybeans from northern Brazil contain little or no GM material.
  • Large-scale, commercial plantings of genetically modified soybeans can also be found in Paraguay, Canada, Uruguay and South Africa.

Chinese soybean imports have skyrocketed by more than 27 times from 0.8 million tonnes in 1995. In addition to the robust domestic appetite for soy products, extensive investment in soybean crushing facilities in Chinese coastal cities has added to China’s escalating demand for imported soybeans.
Over half of the world’s 2007 soybean crop (58.6%) wasgenetically modified, a higher percentage than for any other crop. Each year, EU Member States import approximately 40 million tonnes of soy material, primarily destined for use as cattle, swine, and chicken feed. Soybeans are also used to produce many food additives. 
In 2007, 216 million tonnes of soybeans were produced worldwide. The world’s leading soybean producers are the United States (33%), Brazil (27%), Argentina (21%), and China (7%). India and Paraguay are also noteworthy soybean producers. 
Worldwide soybean production: The first genetically modifiedsoybeans were planted in the United States in 1996. More than ten years later, GM soybeans are planted in nine countries covering more than 60 million hectares. These GM soybeans possess a gene that confers herbicide resistance.

Soybean imports into the EU: Each year, the EU imports approximately 40 million tonnes of raw soy products, primarily from Brazil, the United States and Argentina.

  • Imported soy is predominately used to feed livestock. Without the protein offered by soy, Europe would not be able to maintain its current level of livestock productivity.
  • During processing, soybeans are pressed in oil mills, and the derived oil is extracted and refined for food use.
  • In addition, soybeans are used to produce numerous food ingredients and additives. Lecithin, for example, is used as anemulsifier in chocolate, ice cream, margarine, and baked goods.
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